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CAMERA ERA Exhibition October 13 2014, 0 Comments

CAMERA ERA
Cherryhurst House
March 29 - November 10, 2014
Organized by Project B from the Collection of Barbara Levine
Catalogue available


CAMERA ERA
features photographs that reveal a special relationship with the camera. It may be a sitter striking an iconic pose, or hiding her face… or it may be camera or printing errors or maybe the photographer altering the photo by hand—the kind of photographic 'mistakes' that can now be instantly corrected, but which we love for their very human texture. In today’s digital reality, where every device is a camera and every blip, click and ping contains a picture, it is easy to forget the charisma and mystique of the physical printed photograph.

This exhibition is a collusion between vintage and contemporary technologies. Original small snapshots are shown together with archival images that have been re-photographed and digitally “remastered.” The large format prints reveal the surface wear, detail and patina of the long forgotten photographs to offer a different point of view and remind us of the power of the photograph to stop time and bring alive moments and relationships at once instantly recognizable and deeply enigmatic.

The works in CAMERA ERA invite us on a speculative journey; as anonymous images without a clear backstory, provenance or authorship, they beckon us to fill in the gaps with our own stories and suppositions. We become collaborators in an interactive game of discovery—an exercise at once aesthetic, intellectual, and simply fun.








Exhibition view. CAMERA ERA is organized by Project B for Cherryhurst House, Houston, Texas. Catalogue available. All photographs from the collection of Barbara Levine. For inquiries about the exhibition or limited edition archival ink prints, email me: blevine@projectb.com




Highlights from "SECONDHAND" at Pier 24 September 09 2014, 0 Comments

SECONDHAND is the new exhibition at Pier 24 in San Francisco, California. It features vernacular photography collections and the work of artists who collect found photographs to "construct, edit and sequence in order to create something entirely new". The exhibition is a snapshot of how collectors and artists are discovering, displaying and using vernacular photography in exciting innovative ways to broaden the understanding of the medium and its impact on our lives.

The exhibition has many layers and I snapped a lot of photos on my iphone to document it (one of the great things about Pier 24 is that you are allowed to take photos in the exhibition). Below is Part I of highlights from the exhibition:


Views of Erik Kessels' in almost every picture




Views of installation Album Beauty by Erik Kessels




Detail, Archive of Modern Conflict, Collected Shadows


Joachim Schmid, Portrait Press Photographs


Embroidered Photographs by Maurizio Anzeri


Highlights Part II from my visit to the exhibition SECONDHAND,  coming soon!
Exhibition is on view at Pier 24 from August 4, 2014 - May 31, 2015


Saying Goodbye to My Fotoescultura Guy April 11 2014, 2 Comments

I cannot be in New York City for all the Spring photos shows but my guy, my faithful fotoescultura (whom I affectionately call Pablo) is there. Fotoesculturas were made primarily in Mexico beginning in the 1920s and are highly personal and devotional folk photo sculptures. They were often commissioned by traveling salesmen to commemorate events, memorialize the dead or honor individuals. They were displayed in the home, not unusual to see them on top of televisions and on shelves with other family keepsakes. I've owned this beautiful c.1950s fotoescultura for several years and it has had pride of place in my home. Now, I am looking at him as Lot #128 in the catalogue for the upcoming auction, The Vernacular Eye: Photographic Albums, Snapshots & Objects at Swann Galleries in New York on April 17th. I will miss my Pablo and I hope he finds a good home (he is fabulous!). If anyone sees him at the Swann Gallery auction snap a picture for me!


Houston We’ve Landed! February 18 2014, 0 Comments


Unidentified Photographer, c.1970.

HOUSTON WE'VE LANDED!

We are thrilled to announce our multi-part exhibition and publication, Camera Era: Freeze Frames From A World Long Gone, will debut during the 2014 FotoFest Biennial. The festival is one of the largest photographic exhibitions in the world and our exhibit will be on view starting March 19th thru the end of May.

CAMERA ERA immerses the viewer in domestic photographs made by unidentified photographers during a time when nearly every home had a camera with film in it. The images are all from the PROJECT B Collection of vintage vernacular photographs. Along with original snapshots, we are recasting many of the images as large format prints. We are also excited to announce that the publication, CAMERA ERA, is a collaboration with San Francisco graphic designer, Martin Venezky (of Wes Anderson book fame).

We are now in residence here in Houston preparing the project and getting to know this spirited city! If you are in Houston  join us on March 19th at The Raven Grill and in late March and April at The Cherryhurst House (dates tba) for part two of the exhibition and book launch.

Stay tuned for more details about The Cherryhurst House and the exhibition, CAMERA ERA: Freeze Frames From A World Long Gone.
We are excited! 

 


Vernacular Photography: The Art of the Found July 31 2013, 0 Comments

Courtesy ZieherSmith and Winter Works on Paper

Click on this photo for a fantastic overview of the state of vernacular photography as art and curatorial practice. A must read if you are a vernacular photography collector!

 


Tattered Love July 16 2013, 0 Comments

Collection of PROJECT B / Barbara Levine

This tattered vintage snapshot from 1939, exemplifies the wonderful and mysterious ways photography intersects with people's lives and their private domestic rituals. Vigorously ripped up, repeatedly folded or accidentally left in a pocket and put in the wash, the photo remained precious to its owner and was carefully taped back together. While we will never know if their love lasted, the worn voice of the photograph remains preserved.